Dreadlock Disrimination

Dreadlock Disrimination

Appeals Court Rules Employers Can Ban Dreadlocks At Work

A federal appeals court maintained that it is OK to discriminate against traditionally black hairstyles, like locs. The 3-0 ruling came down on Sept. 15 when the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a claim from a 2014 ruling that said racial discrimination had to be based on characteristics that didn't change, and the hairstyle didn't qualify as "immutable."

Lunar Hair Care

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Lunar Hair Care

Lunar Hair Care

Morrocco Method International has provided the world's finest in raw, vegan, and paleo hair care for more than 50 years. All of our products are sulfate free, gluten free, and free of synthetic chemicals.

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What do the braids of a mummy from Perú reveal?

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What do the braids of a mummy from Perú reveal?

Peruvian mummies' hair reveals ancient last meal

Scientists studied diets of 14 mummies found at the Paracas Necropolis They focused on carbon and nitrogen analysis of keratin in hair strands Nitrogen isotope values in seawater tend to be greater than those on land They discovered that culture loved fish and probably didn't travel much Carbon analysis helped reveal the types of plants the people consumed Hair on 2,000-year-old mummies has helped reveal what Paracas people in Peru ate in the weeks before their death.

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Should dreadlocks affect your education?

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Should dreadlocks affect your education?

Student kicked out for his dreadlocks

A MILDURA high school student is being forced to change schools after St Joseph's College banned his African hairstyle because it is at odds with its uniform policy. It's his culture - this is a very normal hairstyle that's been around for centuries - Caleb Ernst's mother Bec Caleb Ernst, 14, has been told he faces expulsion if he returns from suspension today with his hair still in dreadlocks.

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Are you a criminal?

Braiding Without a License

As of July, braiding hair without a cosmetology license is no longer a crime in the state of Iowa. Two black women, Aicheria Bell and Achan Agit, filed a civil lawsuit against the state's cosmetology board last fall with the help of the Institute for Justice, claiming that occupational licenses threatened their ability to make a living in Iowa, and disadvantaged black stylists in particular because of the braiding's racial and cultural roots.

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